5th Annual Stats: Band & Cups – Bra Size Divided

Hello and welcome back to our annual statistics series! . . . Or as I am tempted to call it “the blog post I keep trying to write but am always interrupted before I can finish!”  Ordinarily, I break this discussion into two separate posts, one for the band sizes and one for the cup sizes.  However, this year, in the interest of changing things up and including other elements into the statistical analysis, I have combined them into a unified post.  Knowing which band and cup sizes generally sell best aids in selecting the overall range to focus new inventory (such as 30-40 DD-G), but analyzing the actual best-selling bra sizes assists in fine tuning that selection as well as knowing what sizes deserve multiples.  So let’s get to it!

year5bands year5cups

Band Size Observations & Notes:

  • We have sold a few 26 bands, but the frequency is so sporadic and the amount so trivial that I have not included them in the graph.  Similarly, I included 50+ bands last year in our statistics but decided to omit them this  year.  Many of those figures are represented by the same core customers, and the distribution was not strong.  As a result, the chart technically represents the percentage of band size sales among 28-48 bands only with another 0.03% of total bra sales occupied by the 26 bands and the 50-56 bands.
  • Band sizes 32 to 38 account for nearly 70% of our total sales, which is identical to last year. If we factor in 40 bands, the figure jumps to nearly 79%, also the same as last year.
  • The 34 band size continues to be our best-selling band size store-wide, accounting for nearly 20% of our sales.
  • 28 and 30 bands only account for 8.7% of our sales which is down slightly from last year.
  • Traditional plus-size bands (38-46) represent 38.4% of our sales, up from last year.

Cup Size Distribution Observations & Notes:

  • Cup sizes UK E through G account for roughly 55% of our sales, down 4% from last year, and if we include D and DD cups, the number jumps to 69.7%, also down from last year.
  • The GG+ cup sizes account for over 26.2% of our sales, up 2% from last year.
  • Traditional mainstream cup sizes A-DDD/E account for nearly 33.7% of our total sales, up almost 3% from last year.

Before I expand on my analysis, I want to remind everyone that these charts are based on five years of cumulative sales, meaning there is no way to distinguish recent areas of growth or decline for some sizes.  However, areas which boast significant increases like A-DDD cups or plus-size bands are driven almost entirely by sales in the 12 months prior.  Because of the cumulative nature of the series, certain sizes are padded by prior sales rather than recent ones, and I want to write a separate post elaborating on these areas of growth and decline further.

The Line in the Sand:  28 vs. 30 Bands

Every year, I specifically mention 28 and 30 bands in the same context, and I debated whether or not I wanted to rehash the discussion this year.  Ultimately, after pouring through the data as well as taking into account my personal experiences as a fitter in the store, I realized the disservice I was giving to 30 bands.  In reality, 28 and 30 bands should not necessarily be lumped together in the same category.  Yes, yes, I know they are adjacent to each other and are separated by a mere 2″, but the subtle difference lies in sales performance.  Our sales figures for 30 bands are completely acceptable for me and have experienced general growth and a better turnover rate in the last 12 months.  We have expanded inventory to incorporate new brands and more styles, and our customers are responding positively, mostly purchasing at full price and ordering multiple colors.  After all, 30 bands perform better than everything outside of the core 32-40 spectrum.  The 28 bands, however, continue to flail in the water.  Comexim special orders and the Freya Deco are the sole life preservers keeping the band size afloat, and outside of this boost, the 28 band size consistently sells on sale rather than full price.  The average 28 band bra retails for $60ish market-wide, but in the shop, the average exit cost is $43 (roughly 70% of estimated retail which drops my profit margin to a paltry 37% at best).  It’s a size that we constantly stock for size inclusivity but whose sales figures do not support or justify a large or diverse selection.  In fact, a few well chosen basics plus Comexim is the direction we’re heading.

Comexim Mixed Colors
Comexim Mixed Colors

For a long time, I was constantly ordering fashion or ensuring we included the size when available as part of a new style—a motivation driven in large part because I felt I needed 28 bands to be truly representative of our customers.  Many feel a specialty shop should obviously carry a large selection in this band, but sales figures paint a rather bleak picture for us.  It doesn’t help that these customers are often either the least satisfied with inventory or the most likely to wait for sales.  People who wear 50 bands or 48 or even 46 tend to understand that stores may not carry that size, even a specialty one, and are usually okay with ordering.  Comparatively, more of the 46 bands (1.4% of sales) sold at full price than the 28 bands (2% of sales), making 46 bands a sounder financial investment despite a lower dollar amount in total sales.  From speaking with other retailers, manufacturers, and bloggers around the globe, 28 bands seem to be a vocal subset but one not strongly represented for actual sales.  I appreciate their passion and commitment, but unfortunately, it’s just not a group that visits the shop frequently or pays full price when they do.  One of my goals for this year has to been to make the shop more sustainable for the future (a topic I will discuss in another post), and I plan on making adjustments to what we offer in store to better capture the needs of the market without carrying excess inventory.

To play devil’s advocate, a counter-argument raised to my statistics on 28 bands posits that if my inventory were more representative of what the customer wants, that sales would naturally increase.  It’s not a point without merit, particularly because there are often scaling and fit issues in 28 bands which make it challenging to select the best products.  A smaller rib cage, regardless of cup size, will need special considerations, but the more time spent on design or on materials to address problems will also increase price.  We have a pretty generous special order policy as a shop for trying new styles and presently offer multiple models in that band size from brands like Panache, Freya, Little Bra Company, Comexim, and Skarlett Blue.  I think the greater issue is that most people who would traditionally wear the 28 band do not like the tightness and opt for 30 or 32 (thus decreasing overall sales figures for the band), and those who do prefer 28 are looking to spend less than $50 at most. If I am being completely honest, fives years of sales figures indicates the demand for the band is greatly overstated, and looking back through recent transactions, the last in-store 28 band purchase was over two weeks ago and was a special order pick-up.  It’s been at least 30 days since I had a walk-in sale for a 28 band.

Plus-Size Bands on the Rise

Goddess Keira - Easy to Love, Hard to Keep In Stock
Goddess Keira – Easy to Love, Hard to Keep In Stock

On the flip side, plus-size bands (38-46) have shown an increase in sales, particularly in FF+ cups.  There were a few months earlier this year where I was barely able to keep 42-46 GG-J cups in stock, and there was a particular Saturday which comes to mind where we had three separate women wearing a UK 46H come in needing bras (the last of which unfortunately had to order as we were completely sold out).  In general, I think we have seen not only more word of mouth referrals from this band size range but also from big box retailers like Catherine’s and Lane Bryant who typically stop at the US H cup and are seeing clients needing something substantially larger.  This band size range is also an area where I have seen some ladies who are simply outside the standard cup sizes produced by most manufacturers, and we have been issuing referrals to Ewa Michalak.  One of my goals for the next 12 months is to stock her K-LL cups in the shop to address the demand.

The Dilution of the Cup Size Concentration

Our original purpose of being a fuller-bust store is well-documented in this statistical series, and for the first couple years, we primarily saw the highest sales in UK E-G cups.  As we have been open longer, we transitioned to being more encompassing of different sizes, especially A-C cups, and the resulting sales have essentially stretched the distribution to create a Bell curve.  Sales for E-G cups have been declining while sales for A-C have been rising fast.  In fact, I noted we were down in D-G, but A-C was up.  Sales in higher cup sizes also increased, meaning the sales represented by the traditional D-G core declined simply because we saw an uptick in sizes on either side, namely A-C cups or GG+.  For giggles, I went back to our first two statistics series, and at that time, we really did not have a true Bell curve but rather what I referred to as “steps” in which cup sizes performed best.  The cup size curve for this year is what I predict to be relatively consistent for the shop in the future too.  The numbers may change slightly (and in fact I do think we’ll see more growth in A-C cups in particular), but the shape for each of the sizes is most likely fully developed.  A-C cups were an area I honestly never expected to see much sales from because we are so close to Victoria’s Secret (the industry leader) as well as department stores like Kohl’s, Belk’s, Dillard’s, and JC Penney.  It’s one of the reasons I focused our initial inventory so fiercely on hard to find sizes like DD+ as I thought we’d be most likely to find a niche with clients who are desperate and unable to find their size elsewhere (like I was for many years).  My rationale was similar with plus-sizes as I fully expected A Sophisticated Pair to focus on 28-40 bands and D-K cup sizes.  Little did I realize that there were many people in A-C cups who were unhappy either with the selection or models offered by competing retailers or who felt like they did not have a positive shopping experience.  As the demands slowly filtered in for more sizes outside that range, we have expanded accordingly by carrying more A-C cups from brands like Natori, Skarlett Blue, b.tempt’d, Wacoal, and Affinitas. We also recently started carrying the Little Bra company, specifically for this customer.  Now if only we could find some great bras for the 38+ bands and AA-C cups we’d really be set!

Bonus Stats!  Knickers!

knickers

Underwear is an area that we have steadily been branching into more, again mostly because of customer demand.  When we first opened, our budget was stretched so thin we squeaked by with Natori bliss panties and the occasional coordinating set.  As the shop grew, we began investing in what are called “pant programs,” typically demarcated by a buy more discount, such as “$18, 3 for $45.”  Natori, Wacoal, and b.tempt’d all offer this in multiple styles, but we also still bring in matching underwear for some fashion bras.  In terms of sizing, medium and large reign supreme.  The size small gets the most boost from the pant programs as I often no longer carry matching bottoms in that size anymore.  Medium and Large are first out the door with X-Large not far behind.  One of the areas we hope to grow as a business is in offering a lot more underwear brands and styles as they really deserve a second shopping trip outside of bras, and we are currently looking at quite a few options for more classic styles like full briefs in addition to cute, affordable plus-sizes.

What did you think of this year’s results?  Were there any surprises?  For the retailers reading this blog, I’d love to hear if our sales collaborate with yours or if you find you serve a totally different demographic.

Erica

P.S.  Other blogs in this year’s series:  A Guide to Interpretation.

P.P.S.  Links to Year 4 Stats:  Demographics, Band Sizes, Cup Sizes, Bra Sizes, and Best-Sellers.

5th Annual Stats: Band & Cups – Bra Size Divided
Erica
Erica is a lover all things lingerie and is passionate about helping people find the bra which fits and flatters. Side passions include reading, writing, hiking, dairy-free food, walking her Jack Russell terrorists, and dying her hair everything from black to red.

21 thoughts on “5th Annual Stats: Band & Cups – Bra Size Divided

  • August 18, 2016 at 11:55 am
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    Great post! I love statistics and posts with numbers. 🙂
    RE: 28 bands
    I have to wonder if there is less demand for this band, not just because they don’t like the tightness but because they can often “make do” with a 32 band that is so readily available, well, everywhere. Whereas someone in the larger band sizes i.e. 46+ really can’t make do with a 38 band and that makes them willing to wait/order what will fit better.

    Reply
    • Erica
      August 19, 2016 at 12:14 pm
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      Hi Nichole! I am a numbers geek too. 🙂 You raise a good point about 28 bands. I do think the prevalence of other band sizes can impact cumulative need for 28s, but for our store, there are 28s in stock. People just find them too tight or uncomfortable and buy bigger, or they are looking for them to cost $30-$45 rather than $55+. A friend of mine who wears a 28 band said she was shocked at first that there weren’t more 28s available because she found it very easy to walk in anywhere and buy clothes that fit fine. Why would bras be any different? It’s not a completely unfair comment because if, as a market, even 30 bands were more commonly available everywhere, it could impact 28 and 30 band sales. It also creates a sense of expectation that in all clothing aspects, that customer should be able to find exactly what she needs based on past experience, but as well all know, bras are a horse of totally different color . . . maybe not even a horse . . . maybe another animal altogether! 🙂 That said, there is a flip side to it in that if you wear 46+ band, you are not able to shop everywhere. As a result, you become accustomed to ordering or frequenting the same retailers to get what you need. Both experiences can shape the way you view shopping as a whole.

      Reply
    • October 9, 2016 at 11:06 am
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      Im nowhere near a 26E with a sister size of 32c. Im wearing a 32D now and its totally uncomfortable. I think i am bigger than that.

      Reply
      • Erica
        October 13, 2016 at 2:26 pm
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        It sounds like the size 32D is not quite right. If the band feels comfortable, but the cup is small, consider sizing up to the 32DD. Measurements and calculators are just a starting point for finding the right fit. It’s been my experience that there are a lot of other variables in the mix, and there really isn’t a substitute for trying some sizes on in person.

        Reply
  • August 18, 2016 at 6:45 pm
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    Whats funny is im currently in a 28GG (down from when i visited you a year ago. Again. Sigh) cleo and i dont consider myself “tiny” or absurdly thin. Admittedly this is in part due to some severe body dismorphia on my part – i honestly know several women who frame wise are much smaller than i am. At 5’9 im not petite – and ive seen many women who are 5′ and wearing kids sizes or 00 sizes who certainly measure smaller than i do.
    I suspect you are right in part that a 30 band is lightyears better than the 32-34s women have been offered in past.
    It sucks for women like myself because brands offer 28 bands in smaller cup sizes if at all. My options for a 28GG are limited to cleo, freya, and polish generally.

    Reply
    • Erica
      August 19, 2016 at 11:41 am
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      Hi Shan! So nice to hear from you 🙂 🙂 We definitely see a lot of ladies measuring 28″ or under, and a too loose band for a long time can impact how they feel about a 28 band, for example. That said, in many cases, I think the lack of general padding on the rib cage can make them more sensitive to not only the tightness but the underwire. I had a lady come in back in early July who measured a UK 28H, but who felt the wires pressed too hard into her ribs and ended up with 30GGs. The sad thing is I do agree 100% that there is a demand for the products, and I think the problem is exacerbated by the fact that some of the styles released by manufacturers are not suited for the size range (wrong underwire shape, too tall, awkward straps, etc). That said, I hear a lot that 28 bands must be very common, but the sales for them are rather low comparatively, particularly when I start looking at things like exit cost vs. MSRP. I’m not sure what the solution for the lingerie market is, but I know for us, there’s a perfect storm of MSRP for 28s being higher than what many 28 customers want to pay, the size being in generally lower demand, and the inventory requests themselves either being hard to justify on our budget or do not exist on the market at all. We’ll see what happens in the future as some traditional core size brands are expanding to 28s, and what they offer may work better. I know Skarlett Blue’s 28s in A-DDD have done well for that customer, and as soon as Wacoal started doing 30s, they hit on a lot of new customers. We shall see!

      Reply
  • August 19, 2016 at 11:41 am
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    Hi Erica! Robynne of Revelation in Fit here. I love this blog series. Your sales very closely mirror ours, especially with the panties. Medium and Large go first, no question, then XL, 2XL, and 3 – 6XL, with XS trailing far behind.

    You are spot on about the line between 28 and 30. Many people who could fit a 28 prefer a 30. I do still sell 28s at full price, but the frequency is much lower than 30 bands.

    I wish more brands will branch into the 40+ A – C range. That’s the customer that I have the hardest time fitting because there just isn’t much available. Right now, I only have Goddess and Ewa Michalak in that range, and Goddess doesn’t make A cups, and EM runs tight, so if someone is a true 46B, an EM bra probably won’t work. I would especially love to see Montelle take on that range, since their bras are great for wide, shallow shapes, and they are a good price point.

    I was also originally going to be a D+ shop, but then I realized that many people would not even walk through my door if they didn’t think I carried their size. I’ve had so many people walk in as a 36C and leave in a 32F (for instance) that I’ve lost count.

    Reply
    • Erica
      August 19, 2016 at 1:56 pm
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      Thanks for commenting Robynne! It’s good to hear from another retailer on this too as I am always curious how similar sales are across different customer bases, particularly for stores like ours which are more “fit based” if that makes sense. 🙂 Our D+ marketing hurt us too. So many women really had no clue what their size was at all that even they were buying D cups already, they still thought of themselves as smaller. Of course, when we stopped the marketing and started to get A-C customers with no A-C stock, it was a whole other dilemma! Hindsight is always 20/20, but there are so many times when I look back at decisions I made like: “Yeah, that was a mistake.” Oh well, live and learn?

      For 28s, we do sell some at full price (usually Freya Deco or Idol and then Comexim), but we do also have to put things on sale too. This happens most with fashion stock. For a while, I always carried 28E-G in whatever fashion style I purchased (provided it was available), but all the other sizes would sell out, leaving only the 28s. I have some ideas on how to continue to serve this customer, but I think I was wrapped up in the vocal demand I kept seeing without letting it sink in that it wasn’t as present here.

      EM is definitely on my radar for customers, but I keep hearing mixed information about the speed/accuracy of orders. Montelle is another one I hear good things about too. Like you, I find that 40+ AA-C cups to be very challenging. I will say that in the C cup range for that size, Wacoal’s new Ultimate Side Smoother is pretty awesome, but the cups do run a smidge generous in that range. I’ve had some success working with American Breast Care, but I have never found the perfect solution. I told my Natori rep that I’d love to see them expand into the range because many of their existing styles would scale perfectly for that customer. Have you tried the new Goddess one for smaller cups? It looks nice, but it’s not a t-shirt bra.

      Reply
  • August 19, 2016 at 7:04 pm
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    As always I find this fascinating, being on the far end of UK core sizing 38/40 GG/H depending on the day (weight is trending down so leaning more to the 38H right now), I am so glad Sculptresse has a style I like (woo ChiChi!!!) now in basic. I hope they can find a couple other styles that gain traction (also reign in their Lisa Frank tendencies). I do agree 40+ A-C is the most underserved market (by designers) but plus size full bust is still really difficult to find in store even though lines exist. Living in large metropolis I would expect options but I haven’t found them. I think Nordstrom’s carries one Elomi style and the specialty boutique I visited didn’t carry any 40+ bands in store.

    All that to say you are doing the Lord’s work and I really appreciate your dedication to a huge size range.

    Reply
    • Erica
      August 20, 2016 at 11:33 am
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      Thank you, Ashley! Sculptresse, imo, has an identity problem. It wants to be 36+ band alternative to Cleo, but the prices are more Superbra territory. I get that they are using Superbra level materials, and I think the quality is on par with the MSRP. But, the designs do not always resonate with our customers (colors too bright, obsession with animal print, and so on). Then, they cancel one style every season, and the collection never seems completely unified to me either. Superbra and Cleo both have groupings that hang well together and have a sense of cohesion. Sculptresse never seems to nail that for me . . . and I want them to so bad! Clearly, I have feelings on this. 😀

      As for availability in general, I think a lot of that has to do with the too many SKUs problem. The more sizes you carry, the less general diversity you can maintain. For a big box store, it’s probably easier and more profitable to carry, let’s say 40 sizes, but then expand on styles, colors, and duplicates. That way, the customers who either genuinely wear those sizes or those who *think* they do can leave with everything they want/need in one go. No orders, no wait times. That’s why I am going to build a bra mecca the three floors and every size known to man with champagne on every floor and trained fitters and . . . sorry, got carried away there. 😉

      Reply
  • August 21, 2016 at 9:53 am
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    Hey Erica: On the topic of Sculptresse – I JUST got the Chi Chi in 34G in the taupe and black. So happy this brand has started making this bra in a 34 band. This bra is perfection – it’s as close a fit to Empreinte for me as I’ll get at this price point. And the sizing is more knowable. It puts everything front and centre. It lifts. It’s comfortable. It’s attractive. The band is delicious (firm but soft – I often wear a 32 band so a 34 that fits is generally on the snug side). The proportions are much better for me at the side cup, band depth and straps than any Cleo (which I wore happily when I was 1 – 2 cup sizes smaller). I’m 46 and my breasts are heavy and projected.

    Furthermore, Chi Chi so well priced, for what you get, that I cannot complain about anything. I hated the Jasmine. It actually put me off Panache – the wires hurt, the upper cup was too stretchy and badly proportioned to the lower cup (too much stretchy lace). It didn’t lift. But this sister style (which fits and looks nothing like the Jasmine on me) is terrific.

    My point – for women who are not plus sized but who do have very projected, middle aged breasts, this bra is a must try. Having said all of this, Sculptresse TOTALLY has an identity problem. I didn’t even realize this bra existed till my wonderful friend and bra boutique owner brought it in for me specifically and made me try it. Then I stole the one she’d brought in for herself! (We’re boob twins. She’s reordering. I couldn’t stop myself!)

    Reply
    • August 21, 2016 at 9:58 am
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      I should also say that I would never even have known this bra exists – or that this brand has started making 34 bands (and isn’t specifically a plus sized line any more) – unless my friend had brought the bra in. And I know ALL the bras. So they’ve got to figure out who they want to be. PS: The endless animal print versions are obnoxious, not because I don’t love animal, but because they’re all ugly, oversized prints that no one would want to wear and it seems insulting for Panache to use them exclusively in the context of plus sized offerings. So I’ll be sticking with the continuity basics in black and taupe.

      Reply
      • Erica
        August 24, 2016 at 2:26 pm
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        I *adore* Chi Chi and was so happy to see them branch into 34 bands. Flirtini is another good one from them which is now in 34s too. In my oh so humble opinion, Chi Chi is superior to Jasmine/Envy in Superbra, and I’m a big disappointed they aren’t offering the same expansive size range. People who try Chi Chi and Envy are preferring Chi Chi in our shop, so it’s a bummer that they do not offer 30s/32s and stop at the HH cup. I’m hoping that with the bra now in basic colors, more people will try it and Panache will see the financial value in expanding the sizing. I’d like to see them offer basics in Flirtini too for this reason. The animal print obsession has been a turn off for a lot of people. Even if you like it (I actually do and have quite a few clothing pieces with it), there is such a thing as too much of a good thing, particularly when that is literally the only choice for the bra. I think what contribute to the identity issue for me is that Panache seems unsure of really backing the line. It’s fairly small (and the frequent cancellations make it smaller still), and they weren’t overly keen to make core items until recently. I love Elomi and Goddess, but the elastic on their bands rolls too much on some customers (whereas Panache doesn’t) so I am selfishly wanting them to really *invest* in their line and in the plus-size customers (they have branched out but that was the line’s original goal). The best way to accomplish this is with more core or fashion in less polarizing prints/colors. Ah, well, we’ll see what the future brings!

        Reply
    • August 21, 2016 at 11:20 am
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      K-Line I agree (although I love the Jasmine) alot of times the only thing I will see from Sculptresse is the Pure (which I don’t like personally). You may have seen it and not realized it just b/c it seems a lot like an Elomi bra with the more natural shape. Panache has totally ruined me for that because now all I want is that great forward projection. I am not sure Erica would have been so keen on the horrible animal print (I mean no one is) but she knows I will try anything with stretch lace (also ruined in that regard), and I loved the bra, the lined wings are especially nice because I feel it distributes the pressure across the band.

      As far as Sculptresse identity I wouldn’t even mind if they had a couple “Cleo” styles and then a couple “Superbra” styles just because being plus size full bust since 6th grade its hard to find “young” plus sized anything. Its certainly gotten better but just saying. Overall though anything not leopard print would be an improvement, I don’t think their print selections are especially great in anyline tbh. Though there are more I like in the Cleo and Superbra lines but they offer more styles so even a broken clock is right twice a day.

      Hopefully having the Chi Chi in basic colors will encourage more retailers to carry at least the one style in plus size range. Did you see the DeeDee? It was based on the Marcie frame and I have enjoyed it as well (ChiChi though is still my fave!)

      Reply
      • Erica
        August 24, 2016 at 2:37 pm
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        I like the idea of them having a mix too as long as there was a bit of cohesion to it (or if they would offer multiple fashion in best-sellers like Chi Chi), but I have to agree this: “I don’t think their print selections are especially great in anyline tbh.” I’m not saying everything is ugly, but it’s a little more rare that I see something from them print-wise which makes me really excited. Now, their Clara bras has had some lovely color combinations, and I’ve seen them work with interesting details too.

        Reply
    • August 21, 2016 at 2:30 pm
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      I’m a 34 band, I need a neutral, and I’m a 51-year-old woman with narrow and deep breasts who loves Empreinte (I have the Daisy) but wouldn’t mind something similar at a lower price point.

      Between your good review and Ashley’s, I … think I’m going to have to try this one out.

      Reply
      • Erica
        August 24, 2016 at 2:38 pm
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        It’s a great bra, Sarah! People love it here. 🙂

        Reply
  • August 21, 2016 at 2:37 pm
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    PS Also not a fan of the leopard print! A continuity line in a spectrum of skin tone shades would fly off the store shelves, would it not?????

    Reply
    • Erica
      August 24, 2016 at 2:51 pm
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      I’d love to see this! Or even some core fashion colors that function as skin-tone alternatives like blush pink, olive, or plum.

      Reply
      • August 24, 2016 at 8:28 pm
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        I would buy them all, especially a collection of jewel toned Chi Chi’s!!! **sigh**

        Reply
  • August 24, 2016 at 12:46 pm
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    Thank you so very much for these posts. They are an invaluable resource! You make so many good points here (how tricky it is to sell 28 bands, the popularity of plus size bras) that I’m also seeing in my own store. And YES to your thoughts on Sculptress’s crisis of identity! I love a good print, but it would be so smart of them to offer more solid colours. Imagine Chi Chi in a deep emerald green. It would fly off the racks!

    Reply

What are your thoughts?