Another Off Topic: PCOS, Body Image, and Health Advocacy

[Trigger Warning: We’re chatting body image, public commentary on weight, and health problems with a sprinkle of NSFW pictures too.]

When I wrote the post outlining my crappy fall (before it got crappier with walking pneumonia), I mentioned how PCOS insidiously corrupted my body, leaving me with symptoms ranging from abdominal weight gain to low vitamin D to scary high triglycerides. Many of my readers sent messages of support or asked about the disorder as well as the book I recommended 8 Steps to Reverse Your PCOS by Fiona McCulloch. Since PCOS affects roughly 10% of all women and trans men of reproductive age, I thought it merited further discussion, particularly because many of us also suffer from depression, anxiety, and poor self image related to weight gain.

Fun Facts About PCOS

  • PCOS, or Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, is an endocrine disorder typically categorized more by a collection of specific symptoms, usually focusing on whether the ovaries contain enlarged follicles. However, recent studies have shown there are four phenotypes ranging in severity. Less severe phenotypes may present with symptoms atypical of older definitions of PCOS.
  • PCOS is often linked with auto-immune conditions, inflammation, insulin resistance, hypothyroidism, and both adrenal and hormonal imbalance.
  • PCOS symptoms include: irregular periods, infertility, weight gain (especially around the abdomen), fatigue, insomnia, unwanted hair growth, thinning hair on head, acne, darkened patches of skin, depression, anxiety, pelvic pain, headaches and hormonal migraines, inflammation in joints and muscles, carbohydrate cravings, hypoglycemia symptoms if there is a long break between meals, and so on.
  • PCOS can also lead to high blood pressure, high cholesterol, heart disease, and type 2 diabetes.

I was diagnosed with PCOS at twenty after years of irregular menstrual cycles, a diagnosis which was officially confirmed during surgery. Somewhere in my paperwork, I have actual pictures, because, hey, how often do you really get see your uterus and ovaries? My doctor at the time suggested birth control combined with dietary and exercise changes to improve the symptoms. The severity of PCOS was never explained to me, and I generally treated the disorder as an inconvenience—a bothersome but harmless nuisance which made my periods late and weight loss challenging. If my doctors weren’t worried, why should I be?

PCOS Awareness Infographic (PRNewsFoto/PCOS Challenge, Inc.)

A couple years ago, I started to feel “off.” Nothing major, just a bunch of little things. I became suddenly lactose intolerant, my periods were more irregular, and I struggled with weight gain. At the time, my research indicated the potential for celiac’s disease since sudden lactose intolerance is a hallmark symptom, but without insurance, I could only speculate. Through the ACA, I was eventually back among the insured, and I became a woman on a mission. My first doctor’s appointment was scheduled, and I wanted tests for celiac’s, hormonal imbalance, and thyroid function. Something was wrong damnit, and we were going to find it! My primary care at the time only ran TSH for thyroid (I’m not going to get into science-y technical details here as there are better resources), which I later learned to be useless in diagnosing thyroid problems with PCOS. He also referred me to a GYN for birth control and a GI doctor for the celiac’s tests. After months of blood work and biopsies, I discovered I did not have celiac’s nor any other problem. I was “healthy.” I certainly didn’t feel healthy, but I was tired and disheartened by the process. I began to question myself. Was I really sick? Was this just part of getting older? Was I looking for something to be wrong?

With my thyroid and digestive system pronounced “normal,” I began playing birth control roulette. My happy weight is 150 to 155, but I was bouncing between 160 and 165. My periods were like my cat, coming and going as they pleased. The obvious solution to most physicians is prescribing birth control because for PCOS it’s kind of like duct tape: not always the best way to solve a problem but certainly the simplest. The hormones force your period back on track, and it can have positive effects on acne, hair thinning/growth, and even weight. However, finding the right birth control is a challenge, especially with PCOS because you are already battling hormonal imbalances. I took my first prescription for five weeks and gained two pounds every week. My boobs ached so much I slept in underwire bras to ease the pain. I quit taking them and gave my body a few months to recover, lost about five pounds of the weight, and spun the wheel again. The next one was better as far as the boobs were concerned and my skin was radiant, but the weight started piling back on and my emotions were, shall we say, tempestuous. You know all those sexist “time of the month” comments? Well, I embodied all of them . . . all day . . . everyday.

Let’s just say there was a lot of furious anger among many other emotions going on with that last set of pills . . .

Another break. By now, I was 175 and flat out told my GYN I cannot gain anymore weight. Bad shit will happen if I do. Enter the Mirena IUD. An IUD is a long term form of birth control, which allegedly does not cause weight gain because the hormones are contained inside the uterus. A lot of women stop having periods with IUDs which is good for someone like myself who also suffers from endometriosis, which is basically a disorder where uterine tissue grows outside the uterus. Of course, delving deeper into the research, including the Canadian version of the Mirena site, more symptoms are listed, including some tasty bits about how it should not be prescribed to anyone struggling with anxiety or depression. Whoops! I had it inserted at the (unbeknownst to me) worst possible time. It was one week before my brother’s horror movie inspired attack. Yeah. My general habits in that time frame afterward were not so hot, so I couldn’t be sure if the new pounds were from the IUD or from alcohol. Best to wait and see. Eventually, I coped with PTSD and resumed healthier habits. Guess what? The weight wouldn’t come off. I didn’t gain anymore, but I wasn’t losing anything either. My doctor along with several Mirena advocates noted you sometimes need to wait as long as a year for your body to really accept the IUD and settle into a routine. I tolerated the problems, praying they would resolve on their own with time. Spoiler alert: They didn’t. The second I stopped exercising or slid back into eating fast food once a week, the weight gain started again. Keep in mind, before I started any form of birth control, I was doing the same things but was bouncing between 160 and 165. Now I was 200 pounds. Enough was a enough.

I had the IUD removed in September of last year and then scheduled a physical. My triglycerides were so high, it was impossible to read other elements of my cholesterol, and my vitamin D (on a supplement) was dangerously low. My blood sugar was verging on pre-diabetic, and my resting heart rate was around 90bpm. Meanwhile, I had never stopped feeling like something was truly wrong with my body. My new primary care prescribed 50,000 IU of Vitamin D taken once a week, which was a huge mistake as the first two days destroyed me with side effects. We retested my triglycerides only to find them higher than the last test. He suggested prescription fish oil, but when my insurance wanted pre-authorization, he switched to straight up cholesterol meds. I googled them, and the side effects didn’t exactly sell them to me.

At the time, I was stressed from my housing situation and cancelled my follow-up appointment to process my grief and find some peace. All through this epic fail, my dad watched on helplessly while I suffered until he found Dr. McCulloch’s book. The more I read, the more relief I felt. Every symptom I had, including some I wrote off as “part of being me,” were explained in detail on those pages. I didn’t need a diagnosis. I had one for over ten years: PCOS! She offers expert explanations of why TSH testing doesn’t always show thyroid problems, why PCOS causes Vitamin D deficiency, even why the damn triglycerdies were so high. On every one of those endless medical forms I filled out with every doctor I saw, I wrote PCOS. No one thought to connect the problems with the disorder, and the solution was to prescribe more medication for the symptoms. I emailed my doctor about treating the PCOS instead and received a two sentence response: “PCOS is a GYN problem. I can refer you to a GYN.” I was freakin’ furious (as in I did not say “freakin'” when I read it).

Just as I was getting my bearings about the changes I needed to make, walking pneumonia struck. Steroids and two months of couch time bumped up my weight to 210 pounds—the same weight I was during my first professional bra fitting. I was so angry, angry with myself, angry with my body, angry with my doctors. How I could let myself get to this point again? I swore never to be this unhealthy, that I would stay in shape and take care of myself. When I felt able, I made an appointment with my GYN who listened to my concerns and referred me to an endocrinologist. Given the past labs and the symptoms, she thought it best to coordinate with an expert, something I appreciate. The entire experience reminded me that when it comes to your health, you are your best advocate. I am in no way disparaging medical professionals, but you need to trust your instincts and ask questions. Without that advocacy, you could take medications which make you worse or miss an important diagnosis. Women’s health concerns are more likely to be dismissed than men’s, and overweight people often suffer from doctors viewing the extra pounds as the sole cause of all that ails them. Stand up for yourself, and don’t ever let a doctor make you feel like you don’t know your body. If you feel sick, then chances are something underlying is wrong. Just channel your inner Dorothy.

I haven’t seen the endocrinologist yet, but I am hopeful. Dr. McCulloch’s book is an essential resource if you have PCOS. She expertly analyzes how the body creates destructive feedback loops which exacerbate problems ranging from inflammation to adrenal imbalance to insulin resistance. PCOS is a big deal. When properly managed, you can eliminate many ill effects, but when it’s not, PCOS can cause life threatening repercussions. It affects everything in your body, targeting each system and weakening it. Dr. McCulloch writes from a place of understanding. She suffers from PCOS and incorporates up-to-date information on the disease as well as comprehensive lab suggestions and treatment options, including dietary and lifestyle changes, prescription medication, and herbal supplements.

The continued weight gain did not go unnoticed by my body image demons either. They sensed weakness and descended upon me with a vengeance. I could barely look at myself in the mirror, none of my clothes fit, and to top it all off, I was and am still sick. How can you lose weight when you can’t breathe well enough to exercise? I was at an emotional low point, and for the first time in a long time, other people made it worse. On my counter, I have a framed picture of a newspaper clipping from when we opened six years ago. I love it because it symbolizes a dream made reality, a proud moment in my life that I share with everyone. With my face and stomach becoming rounder, comparisons to that blissfully naive twenty-five year old were inevitable I suppose. “You look so young.” “You were so pretty then.” “You were a lot thinner.”

It hurt. A lot. It hurt so much I was going to take the picture off the counter, tuck it away somewhere even I didn’t have to see it. It’s hard enough to stay positive about your body when your inner dialog harps on your weight and size, but when others entangle themselves in your narrative, they unintentionally validate every negative thought you have about yourself. It becomes that much easier to be critical the next time, knowing the outside world reinforced your existing beliefs. After the last comment I received about my weight, I fought back tears and extended my hand to collect the frame. But, I stopped. I stopped because I am damn proud of myself, of what I set out to do with this store and of what I’ve accomplished. If we closed tomorrow, I can honestly say this experience changed my life and the lives of others in a good way. I’ve made a positive impact on other people and on our community. That picture was the first step toward greatness, and now I’m going to take it down because of some stupid comments that I don’t look the same anymore? Screw that. I went through a lot the last six years, and I’ll be damned if I’m going to let someone telling me I looked thinner when we first opened destroy the wonderful milestone that picture represents. You don’t get to take that from me.

I’m not going to lie. I still struggle daily. My weight is a reminder that just as I need to curtail these perfectionist ambitions with my work, I also need to cut my body slack too. When I weighed 210 pounds before, I worked at a computer, never exercised, and ate an abysmal diet (A “healthy” lunch was peanut butter and cheese crackers, Doritos, and Coke). Losing weight was slow but easier as I only had to make healthy changes. This time, I am not sedentary nor do I eat much in the way of fast or processed food. I drink water and green tea, avoid sweets, and generally do alright in the food department (okay, pre-book I was a bit of a carbaholic for potatoes, rice, and bread). Moving forward means cutting even more out of my diet and shifting my exercise priorities to accommodate my current metabolic conditions. It means more sacrifice.

My plus-size family set the stage for how I generally viewed weight. My grandparents were warm, kind, lovable fat people who gave their nutritionist the bird and ate whatever the hell they wanted. Life was too short. They paid the price with a host of weight and dietary based illnesses, the combination of which ultimately led to their passing. But, for some of us, our bodies demand more to stay healthy than we want to give. If all you need to do is cut out fast food and drink water to lose weight, it’s a different experience than the person who has to monitor the insulin count of every meal and every snack. Exercise is another source of tension. My brother and I engaged in a nasty argument because he claimed I was making excuses for not exercising, a sentiment echoed by another (coincidentally) male friend. Both never had experience being so damn out of shape either. The closest my brother came was after his recovery. He could only run the mile in eight and half minutes and needed to drop his weights by twenty pounds. He complained . . . whined incessantly about incredibly how out of shape he was now.

I had well meaning friends tell me to cut out carbs, pick up running, take weight loss supplements, join a gym, go Paleo, go Keto, and so on. If you’ve never struggled with weight, especially the result of an endocrine disorder, then telling someone to just eat less and exercise more is kind of a slap in the face, provoking a sarcastic “Gee whiz! Why didn’t I think of that before? You’re a flippin’ genius!” worthy moment. Try lifting weights when you are so tired you can barely lift yourself off the couch or cutting back on carbs only to feel starving all the time. It is easy so spout off suggestions or make thoughtless comments, even if they come from a place of kindness or concern, when your body responds differently. Hell, the last time I started losing weight, a well-meaning nurse told me I looked fantastic. “Before you were just a pretty face, but now you’re the whole package.” At the time, I was twenty-one and coming off months of being harassed by male peers about my weight, and that compliment made me feel amazing. Flash forward ten years and now the comment stands out for all the wrong reasons.

My episode of PCOS Gone Wild has taught me how much I internalized about weight and body size despite promoting body positivity openly. I frequently talk of not judging people, of showcasing beauty in all shapes and sizes, and of dumping this stupid nonsense about our weight in the first place to focus on what makes us awesome. But, then I call myself “fat” or complain about my current weight—a weight, by the way, other people weigh now or want to weigh in the future. That’s pretty shitty of me. Holly was right on the Lingerie Addict. There’s a dark side to the body positive moment. There’s this inherent conflict between critiquing yourself while also promoting beauty for all body sizes and shapes. It reads false and disingenuous because you inevitably criticize something about your new body that is identical to someone else’s existing body. Who cares if you claim every body is beautiful if, when it’s crunch time, you can’t even love your own? I don’t have these answers to these questions, but it made me think a lot harder about why I was tearing myself down, where these feelings came from in the first place, and how I could do better in the future, not only when thinking about myself but also in how I interact with others. Mindful speaking is something we could all practice. And when in doubt, just don’t talk about someone else’s weight or body. You have no idea where they are on their journey or how your words will affect them.

Erica.

P.S.  Here is a comprehensive resource for PCOS as well as a great article from Sweets on losing weight in public.

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Another Off Topic: PCOS, Body Image, and Health Advocacy
Erica

Erica is a lover all things lingerie and is passionate about helping people find the bra which fits and flatters. Side passions include reading, writing, hiking, dairy-free food, walking her Jack Russell terrorists, and dying her hair everything from black to red.


20 thoughts on “Another Off Topic: PCOS, Body Image, and Health Advocacy

  • April 27, 2017 at 8:32 pm
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    You are so right about being your own advocate. I kept changing Docs until I found one who would listen to me ,I mean really listen! And understood that I was the one calling the shots. It is called PT centric health care. You know your body better than anyone.This means doing what you are doing research and more research.I wish you the best in your quest for good health.

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    • Erica
      April 28, 2017 at 5:47 pm
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      Thanks, Frank! I felt like both of my primary cares tried to dismiss the issues as hypochondria until the test results started to show underlying problems becoming worse, but then to not even want to attempt treatment or give me any kind of advice was beyond unacceptable. For all that time in school, some doctors still have a lot to learn about treating patients!

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  • April 27, 2017 at 8:47 pm
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    Erica I feel your pain! I have ‘thin’ pcos and i was told i couldn’t have pcos because i was underweight even though i had many symptoms associated. I pushed for a scan and liw and behold..cysts. I have had such bad experiences with gps who mostly have no clue how to treat pcos and think it’s a ‘gyno’ problem. I have had bloods which haven’t revealed much yet but hopefully i will get some clue what’s going on eventually..it does worry me as i present as atypical 🙁 anyway huge hugs and hope you get the help you deserve. X

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    • Erica
      April 28, 2017 at 5:50 pm
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      I love how PC think PCOS is for GYNs only. It affects so many more systems than just the ovaries, and I’ve heard thin PCOS people often get the most friction about a diagnosis. FWIW, the book specifically discusses phenotypes without weight issues, including modifications for supplements and diets too. She seems to understand PCOS does not come in only one form, especially with the latest resource. The worst thing I did was brushing off the original diagnosis, and I can’t help but think I’d be in a better place if I took it more seriously sooner. I hope you get the help you need too! <3

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  • April 28, 2017 at 6:12 am
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    I relate to this so much. My struggle with PCOS has been long and frustrating, even heartbreaking at times. Thank you for sharing this. Sending you good vibes and hopes for a full recovery from the pneumonia soon

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    • Erica
      April 28, 2017 at 5:51 pm
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      Thanks, Emily! That pneumonia is the WORST. It’s getting better though. 🙂 I’m sorry to hear you’ve had such a struggle too. It’s not an easy disorder to cope with, especially when it comes to certain symptoms.

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  • April 28, 2017 at 9:56 am
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    Erica, your posts are always courageous, but this one still stands out. I totally identify with the struggle between body positivity for others and self-condemnation re: my own size. There’s PCOS in my family, too, and I worry that I may get to the point of trying to have kids, struggle, and find out I have it, too. I wish you the best in pursuing your health and as you continue to strive to fully love yourself as you are. Know that you’re not the only one trying to balance those two things!

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    • Erica
      April 28, 2017 at 5:54 pm
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      Thank you, Janice! I am glad you enjoyed the post. <3 It's hard to balance those internal feelings we have and how we interact with others. I always told my parents "Your body isn't the one I'm judging" whenever I made comments about my weight, but at the same time, my words still impacted them in ways I didn't realize. I think if we weren't bombarded all the time to be a certain weight/shape and instead focused on being caring, loving people, then we'd all be the better for it! Re PCOS: Be proactive about it. Fertility problems are usually when many women are diagnosed because of issues with ovulation, but you may feel better sooner if you make changes now. Plus, PCOS does seem to have some hereditary components. My mom had it, and I'd be my grandma did too.

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  • April 28, 2017 at 12:29 pm
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    Erica, thank you so much for this brave and honest post. As someone with a chronic condition that docs are helpless at treating along with history of depression anxiety and on and off struggles with eating disorders so much resonates. Raising 3 kids, 2 boys and a girl, all with different body types implicates the need to set a positive example – all kids need body positive messages – and it’s challenging personally and with our culture of being bombarded with the ideal of physical perfection.

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    • Erica
      April 28, 2017 at 5:57 pm
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      I am glad you enjoyed the posts, Keri, and thank you for the kind words. I can’t imagine having children and trying to raise them with a good sense of self esteem and happiness physically. There’s just so much pressure, but I am sure you are doing an amazing job. My hat is off to you and the strength you have. Thank you for sharing!

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  • April 28, 2017 at 12:39 pm
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    Thanks, Erica. To this day nobody’s sure if I have PCOS, or did at one point. I had an FSH:LH ratio of 2:1 or 2.5:1 or so, a lot of insulin resistance (acanthosis nigricans, which wasn’t great for my body image) so I felt like crap, and had a history of cysts…but the endocrinologist did an ultrasound and said that there was no telltale ‘string of pearls’ and my other hormones weren’t out of bounds, so she wouldn’t diagnose me. She said at the stage and age I was at, lifestyle changes would have to happen anyway. Somehow those changes worked on the insulin problem, so I felt better there, but I never shed the weight.
    You have done so much. I remain in awe.

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    • Erica
      April 28, 2017 at 6:00 pm
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      Thank you Lee for the sweet words of encouragement! <3 Check out the book with your history. The "pearls" are no longer necessary to be classified as having PCOS, especially if you have a lesser phenotype (there are four). Some people never present with them but have many of the other symptoms of the disease. Even if you don't have it, there's still good information for thyroid and insulin resistance too which could improve how you feel. Diet and exercise help, obviously, but sometimes there's other supplements which can give you a boost too. She does a lot of great science-y explanations, which I appreciate, and treats the reader like an adult while also still humanizing the many ways the disorder can affect our lives.

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  • April 29, 2017 at 11:49 am
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    PCOS is a hard, soul-destroying, and if you’re lucky, character-building journey. I had been on the lean side until PCOS hit in my early-20s. In one year, I gained 50 lbs & watched as facial hair appeared. I was horrified. Your body feels like a runaway train beyond your control. I was in the UK then & as you mention, the go-to was BCP’s. But they have something called Diane in Europe & Canada, with a kind or progestin that is similar to spironolactone (the old standby treatment here). I took it for 6 months & my body came back into balance. 30 lbs just melted off. Back in the US, I had no access to it, and the weight crept back on. And the facial fur intensified. I remember my late 20s as a decade of plucking & waxing & dieting. Miserable.

    What finally reversed the PCOS for me in the late-90s was a few months of metformin (like a nuclear blast for the insulin resistance, along with the awful side effect of nausea that lasted the whole time), the Zone diet (30% protein, 40% carbs, 30% fat) which was revolutionary in a time of low-fat madness, and weights – I started small, with 8 lb dumbells. My periods went back to their usual reliable schedule, the weight stabilized (though remained set at a higher point than before) and the hallmarks of PCOS became undetectable in lab work. I never took metformin again, but did take saw palmetto on/off as an androgen-blocker. But the extra fur was there to stay. And my metabolism was permanently altered. I wouldn’t wish it on anyone, but it did leave me a kinder, less judge-y person, really transforming my relationship with my body to one of understanding and peaceful acceptance. And a dark Irish sense of humor helps. I called it the Gerbil disease (fat & furry) and saw the irony in the fact that my fertility remained completely unaffected – the one symptom I would have been happy to have – while my cousin with PCOS, who desperately wanted a family, remained thin & fur-free, but infertile. Sometimes the gods do like to amuse themselves.

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    • Erica
      April 29, 2017 at 12:32 pm
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      Thanks for sharing your journey, Alicia! Your fast weight gain definitely mimics what I have found. If I slack off, even for a couple weeks, it’s like the expression “When the parents are away, the kids will play.” It just balloons out of control with symptoms, but it takes twice as long to stabilize it. And yes, the Gerbil disease is a funny way of looking at it. 😀 I have more the hair thinning issues depending on my levels, but friends have found the same thing with unwanted hair. Metformin is one of the treatments recommended in the book, but she also mentioned the Chinese herb Berberine which is supposedly similar to Metformin without most of the side effects. You can buy it OTC too, but she advises only testing it on under physician supervision as it does interact with other prescriptions. I took the original Metformin for a few months with my other doctor, but it really didn’t do much for me whereas (at the time) BC did. And then he forgot I was on metformin and prescribed me oxycodone for post-surgery, and I broke out in SUPER RED hives everywhere. I joke and say that my mind is like Peter Pan and my body is like his pesky shadow, lol. We’re forever at odds!

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  • April 29, 2017 at 3:55 pm
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    Erica- Thank you for sharing your story and providing insight to the challenging world of women’s health. You are fighting to do what is best for you, and while a struggle, it is admirable. And please don’t ever take that framed newspaper clipping down! I look at it every time I’m in the store- it inspires me (and I suspect others) to do what I love and not let fear hold me back.

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    • Erica
      April 29, 2017 at 5:33 pm
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      Thanks, Sam. 🙂 Don’t worry, the newspaper clipping is here to stay! It is a testament to the struggle and my printed documentation of the great water fountain debacle, lol.

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  • May 2, 2017 at 12:48 am
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    Thank you for sharing yourself so honestly. I have been in a similar place with doctors, and the best thing I ever did was go to a reproductive endocrinologist. She gets it! PCOS hair issues still wreck my day sometimes but I have stabilized my blood sugar and lost 30 lbs on keto. I hope you find your body’s combination of food and medication and relaxation that finally works! Just remember you inspire many people and you don’t even know it.

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    • Erica
      May 2, 2017 at 11:31 am
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      Thank you for the support, Sarah! I’d really like to be able to go to a doctor with an open mind toward herbal remedies. I saw my endocrinologist yesterday, and she was very nice but she seemed at a loss on how to treat all the symptoms I have right now. She said we’ll focus on the weight first and then go from there, and of course, metformin was brought up. I’m just not sure I want to do prescription route, especially when I’ve read there are herbs used in Chinese medicine with similar results without more side effects. Hopefully the blood work will give us better insights too. Thanks again for encouraging me, and believe me when I say how happy I am for you that you found something that works for you. It’s tremendously hard to do, but it makes all the difference! <3

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  • May 31, 2017 at 7:01 pm
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    I first had symptoms when i was 17 and was told that i had PCOS (thin people type PCOS) and was officially diagnosed at 22 ans now i am 35. I have always had regular periods and unless on birth control pills were they irregular at times and I had a hard time getting pregnant because of the absent periods. I was always told by doctors that I would have a hard time conceiving so I would only go on the pill periodically which i did for more than 4 years, not for protection against getting pregnant, but just to get a period (since I was told it’s not healthy to have less than 4 or so periods a year). Last time I went on a 3 month birth control pill and then stopped again because the medicine was not curing my pcos nor making me get pregnant. I went in search for a cure and ended up with so many drugs, medicine and even soaps that didn’t work. I actually thought at a point that i was cursed that there is no cure for it, i was prepared to live like that till i read a testimony of a patient who suffered from pcos whose case was even worse than mine and how she was cured completely, I was amazed and at thesame time anxious and curious so i had to contact the doctor with the contact details that she left on the note. The doctor gave me so much hope and confidence with her kind words of encouragement to believe in myself and i was lifted because no one has ever given me hope like that before. I ordered the medicine, took it for 8 weeks and to my complete surprise, all the facial hairs, weight gain and all disappeared within 4 weeks and I ended up getting pregnant within a few weeks of completing the treatment! I was in shock. I think the main reasons it happened was that I never gave up and was ready to try alternative treatment so my body was back to normal. Before now i never enjoyed sex because it was very painful but now i do and my husband is the best thing that ever happened to me.. I hope this inspires some of you because I never in a million years would have thought that I would get pregnant and was getting frustrated and now our baby is due next month!

    Reply
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