Product Review: Trusst Suzanne

Hello Everyone,

A few years ago, Trusst Lingerie began with a dream of ditching underwires in favor of using new 3D printing technology to offer support and shaping for a fuller bust. Shortly before their successful Kickstarter campaign, the company approached me about providing a review of their prototype as well as offering any feedback on ways it could be improved. It remains my second most controversial review right behind that dreadful Eshakti dress (Yeah, I said it and still stand by it). Many people here and around the web asked why Trusst felt the need to reinvent the wheel. Why throw out all of the progress made by existing manufacturers? After all, bras have steadily improved in the last ten years because of increased interaction between brands and consumers as well as through technological innovations which improve quality without drastically increasing price. Why not use the insights and failures of your competitors to take standard bras one step closer toward consumers’ ideal? As someone with an engineering and math background, this is a classic strategy which often yields consistent success, especially in computer programming. However, there are other times where tenacious risk-takers create something totally unique or even solve problems previously thought unsolvable through unconventional methods. Of course, sometimes those same innovators failed too, so it’s a bit of a toss up.

The other gripe regarding my review was the state of the prototype, something both Laura of Trusst and I realized in retrospect. It was a bit of a hot mess, particularly because it was thrown together as quickly as possible to coincide with the Kickstarter launch. There were strange shape issues, frayed hems, and glue spots, but at the end of the day, my approach was to ask: Could this idea be viable if properly funded? And in my opinion, the answer was and still is “Yes.”

Trusst Suzanne, US 32DDD-J; 34-36DDD-J; 38DDD-I; 40E-H, 42E-G, $88

Trusst derives its name from “truss,” an architectural term for structures usually consisting of beams or rafters, which support a heavy object like a bridge or roof. The idea behind their bras is to use a shelf-like truss instead of an underwire to gently lift the tissue up, alleviating stress from the shoulders, back, and neck. Because of the solidity of the shelf, Trusst currently only offers molded cup designs which masterfully conceal the interior structure. In fact, I had to scrunch the cup to showcase where the truss ended in the photos.

Note where the shelf structure ends

For sizing, Laura actually visited me at the store, and ultimately, I found the Suzanne in size US 36J (UK 36GG) to be my favorite combination. Right now, I am between a US 34K (UK H) and US 36J (UK 36GG), leaning more toward the 34 band, and I would say Suzanne runs firm in the band but overall true to size. If you are between sizes or prefer a slightly looser fit, definitely size up.

During both shooting the video and hammering out the written review, I have struggled to be concise in analyzing the fit. In most reviews, I use comparisons to other products or rely on basic information most people have regarding how a bra is made in order to dive into the pertinent elements of who the bra will fit and why. With Trusst, the entire concept is totally new. The technology seems to borrow elements from both underwire and traditional non-wire bras, and as such has fit elements from both. For example, the gore of Suzanne does not fully tack since it lacks significant center structure in favor of soft flexibility. As I mentioned in my Samanta reviews, not all manufacturers strongly emphasize tacking in the way UK and US brands do, and with Trusst, the lack of a hard wire pressing against the sternum is not necessarily a bad thing even if it makes tacking impossible. With most wireless bras, unless you are smaller busted, the centers do not tack either nor do they offer any separation. With Suzanne, despite not having a full tack, my breasts do stay separated and contained inside the cup, even with a wider center gore. It’s almost magical as I feel like science says my boobs should be all mooshed in the center, but they seem pretty contained and comfortable. Personally, I would love to see the gore overlap in one style, especially for close set types like myself. It may not come closer to tacking, but it would diminish the mild east-west profile I am receiving.

The cups themselves are molded and rounded with nice projection. Shallower breast shapes may end up sizing down for a better fit, and softer tissue types may not achieve the same separation. In all honesty, I’d love to attend one of the Trusst fit events to see how it works on a larger scale. With normal bras, I have six years of experience helping to identify what will work and for whom, but here, it’s at once so different from and yet so reminiscent of standard bras that it’s hard to gauge.

On the sides of the cup, the shelf structure also tapers before the top, making it comfortable and less stabby to wear while also anchoring, supporting, and smoothing the sides. The wings are fairly wide offering nice containment for my fluffier shape (i.e., it’s covering my back fat nicely). Lightly padded, partially-adjustable straps feature an optional J-hook in the back, and I must admit the bra is super comfy. Between the truss interior and the molded cup, the bra does feel heavier, and I wonder how cool it will be on hot days (although some people say it actually conceals sweat marks better than normal bras). The comfort itself is fabulous though. I usually experience rubbing or chafing from sides as high as Suzanne’s, but the fabric is soft with more give, allowing it to cover tissue without cutting in when I move my arms. Most of the breast weight is taken off my shoulders and back, and what little remains for the straps is cushioned by the padding.

Originally, I envisioned this bra as an option for picky wireless customers (I love y’all, but there’s a lot of unrealistic expectations for this market) who crave more support and shape without the underwire. After trying the final product, I realize this is not a bra for that market. The Trusst support system does press against the rib cage on the front and partially on the side, and the common complaints I hear regarding wires, such as pain in the ribs, digging into the stomach when seated, and pressure on the side, are not going to be alleviated. Instead, the Suzanne may work for people who tolerate wires but struggle with comfort, especially those with heavy dense tissue which needs a lot of support.

Despite my review struggles, there was one comparison that immediately came to mind with this bra. Trusst Suzanne reminds me of the beloved Panache sports bra. The cushioning along the ribs, the heavy molded cup, the partially adjustable padded straps, and the j-hook feature are all classic Panache sports bra elements. It amuses me because I have seen countless companies successfully and unsuccessfully try to rip off what Panache created, and ironically, Trusst has achieved something with similar features going a totally different route. I want to note I am not saying this as a negative. People freakin’ love that bra. We have a whole segment of customers who only wear the Panache sports bra, and all of them describe their breasts in the same way: heavy and dense. They like the way the Panache sport comfortably supports them, and I think you see similar features here. Not to mention, because it’s a sports bra, the Panache is very full coverage, always looks sporty (obviously), and does have a seamed profile under clothes. Trusst has a sweetheart shaped neckline, making it more discreet under clothes, a smoother profile under tee shirts, and has a sophisticated, bra-like aesthetic. The black fabric is sleek and soft, and the lace on the gray background is nice. For me, this is a basic black bra with a twist.

The price point on the bra is $88 which definitely treads into the luxury bridge market. I am sure the use of 3D printing technology adds a higher cost than traditional wires, and the fabrics utilized here are also top notch. The interior of the cup is lined in a fabric that feels like a worn-in tee shirt, and everything from the powermesh wings to the padded straps to the sleek exterior cup fabric is in keeping with many of the $70+ bras I see. There’s also something that occurred to me after I shot the video with regard to quality and price. I feel pretty confident you are not going to be able to get this inner truss system out of the bra without resorting to scissors. I may have abused the bra I was given trying to shift it around, and that stuff is in tight. What does this mean? No popped or snapped underwires! If you take care of this bra, you’re really only looking at needing to retire the bra when the band is stretched out. And while I can’t say this for certain, I feel the interior system anchors to the ribs and doesn’t need to be pulled as tightly as a wire, thus adding to the bra’s longevity.

In closing, I have to commend Trusst for taking the hot mess of a prototype and turning it into a polished product for the marketplace. Is this bra for everyone? Absolutely not, but no bra is. I also think it’s worth noting that Trusst is actively listening to their clients and working with them to continue improving the designs. For a Kickstarter campaign with humble beginnings, the brand truly utilized the donations and has only gotten better.  But, I’m curious. What do you think? Would you kick the underwires to the curb and try something like this?

Erica

P.S. If you’d like to read some other perspectives, check out reviews by Quinne of The Lingerie Addict and Quirky & Curvy.

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Product Review: Trusst Suzanne
Erica
Erica is a lover all things lingerie and is passionate about helping people find the bra which fits and flatters. Side passions include reading, writing, hiking, dairy-free food, walking her Jack Russell terrorists, and dying her hair everything from black to red.

20 thoughts on “Product Review: Trusst Suzanne

  • May 9, 2017 at 9:07 pm
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    How can we find out when Trusst has a bra fitting event and where? I would like to see them make bras for bigger band sizes and men!

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    • Erica
      May 11, 2017 at 11:51 am
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      Hi Paul! I’d contact Trusst directly and see where they have planned pop up shows as well as to bring up the idea of making some of for male customers. They seem open to new directions and ideas! 🙂

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  • May 10, 2017 at 12:49 am
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    I would definitely consider it, but I have to admit that the combination of a center gore that doesn’t tack plus the east-west profile makes me leery

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    • Erica
      May 11, 2017 at 11:53 am
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      Thanks for commenting, Casey! I think if the gore was more overlapping the mild east-west shape would be completely front and center. I’d like to see them offer this on one of the models at some point myself. It’s certainly comfortable and very lifted!

      Reply
  • May 10, 2017 at 3:13 pm
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    Do you think the pressure on the ribs is lower than a wired bra, like does the truss create more of a longline bra effect? My bra band is the smallest part of me so lengthening downwards isn’t usually a great match for me.

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    • Erica
      May 11, 2017 at 2:11 pm
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      I think it sits slightly slower than a wired bra but not necessarily as low as a longline. There is some extra fabric below it which hits lower, but there’s stretch too. Sadly, I think you’re not in their initial cup size run right now, but I’d keep an eye out on what they have for the future. 🙂

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  • May 12, 2017 at 2:16 pm
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    Maybe I am a bit dim but why have they done this? it looks like the dreadful bras I used to have to wear BB (Before Bravissimo). Makes you look heavy and the shape is too east west and the gore doesn’t tack, plus it doesn’t help back bulge… I like the idea of a soft lining, though.

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    • Erica
      May 31, 2017 at 8:43 pm
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      Hi Janice! They’re trying to tackle comfort issues presented by bras in another way. In clothes, the shape is definitely better (I think I should start doing reviews with t-shirts to show the shape too), and it actually does a great job of smoothing my back. It is a heavier shape, but the support is effortless. While the gore doesn’t tack, that’s not necessarily the intention. Each manufacturer comes into the design game with their own ideas, and not every idea will work for every person. It sounds like you have some awesome bras as is, but there are people struggling a lot with comfort and fit that this may work better for in the long run. That’s what is so cool about this industry: we’re getting more and more options! 😀

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  • May 15, 2017 at 9:13 pm
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    This sounds intriguing, but I am wondering about one thing. I have read comments about the significant amount of padding in the cups, and I was wondering whether you find that it makes you look larger. I generally avoid padded bras because my bust is already 3″ larger than my hips, so I don’t need anything to make me look even bigger on top.

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    • Erica
      May 31, 2017 at 8:39 pm
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      Hi Laurie! I would say the padding is on par with a Freya Deco in terms of the actual molding. I don’t feel like I look bigger with the bra on, certainly no more than my Comexim’s (but again, those are padded too). If you dislike molded or padded cups though, I’d skip this style and look at some other brands on the marketplace . . . at least until they figure a way to include the interior truss without a padded cup. 😀

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  • May 22, 2017 at 12:21 pm
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    Ohhh, I’m wondering two things, do you think this model would be more comfortable than a softish underwire during a long plane flight (9 hours or more) and what is the “not underwire” width and shape as compared to an underwire bra like elomi Kate or the panache sport? We are a similar size and squish ; though I am softer and wider.
    By the way, your hair is looking very nice these days!

    Reply
    • Erica
      May 31, 2017 at 8:32 pm
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      Hi Bern! I’ve never been on a plane although I have had long car rides before (when I was house hunting, we did “turn and burns” consisting of 15 or so hours of driving). I think it would be more comfortable than many of the underwire styles for the simple fact it feels cushioned along the ribs and is not so high on the side of the arm. That said, I think it really depends on your shape. I wore the Cleo Marcie four hours up to the mountains in a car, three hours hiking, and then four hours back without issue. And I traveled long trips more than once in the Panache sport too. I will say Trusst has become a go-to comfy bra for me. I wasn’t feeling well one day and put a sign on the store to text if you stopped by. So, when I got home, I kept my bra on and just put on some sweats. I took wore it all day including for a two hour nap and didn’t feel the need to rip it off at the end of the day. There’s also limited metal to it as well which could be helpful at an airport. Do you have any boutiques nearby? They are doing pop up shops a lot, which could be an easy way to try them out! 🙂 Oh and thank you for the sweet comments about my hair. <3

      Reply
  • May 23, 2017 at 5:43 pm
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    I’ve been wondering for years if someone could integrate bridge technology and bras! (I may or may not have googled “cantilever bras” on multiple occasions to see if it had been developed yet) and behold!! Here it is, a thing of wonder and beauty!

    Reply
    • Erica
      May 31, 2017 at 8:27 pm
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      Cantilever Bras has kind of a cool ring to it, no? 😀

      Reply
  • July 5, 2017 at 1:30 pm
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    Thank you for a very interesting review! But I am wondering, isn’t this product somewhat similar to the Charnos Bioform bra which was developed around 2000? It had a sort of plastic wings instead of a regular underwire. I tried it on once and it was very uncomfortable 🙁 Here’s a piece of news about that product: https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2000/nov/17/fashion2 And you can see a picture here: http://www.qualitylingerie.co.uk/contents/media/charnosB001L.jpg
    I wonder how high do these hard parts come up at the sides? Don’t they dig in? Are they flexible?

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    • Erica
      July 6, 2017 at 5:16 pm
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      How interesting, Kasica! I had never heard of these although there does seem to be overlap in that both companies are eschewing underwires for something entirely new. it’s been a few weeks since I wrote this article, and I have worn the Trusst bra multiple times (including while lounging on the couch) and find it super comfortable. The interior structure stops fairly short on the side to prevent digging and uses the cup to really keep tissue in place (this could also be why it a little more east-west in profile than other bras). When I was sick or bouncing back and forth between the house and the shop, it was the Trusst bra I grabbed. Not to mention, I get severe breast tenderness certain times a month, and the Trusst bra has helped alleviate that significantly (at least while it’s on). So for me, I found it comfortable despite the fact the support system has no flexibility whatsoever. I don’t wear it with all clothes or necklines, of course, and there are things I’m not crazy about . . . but for me, comfort is not one of those factors. 🙂

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      • July 19, 2017 at 8:21 am
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        Wow, g=this is very good news that it’s so comfortable in the long run! Thank you Erica 🙂

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        • Erica
          July 21, 2017 at 2:16 pm
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          You’re welcome! I just wish it was closer together for a more narrow profile, but the comfort really is nice. 🙂

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What are your thoughts?